Running to a Healthy Future

The year was 1983 and the first summer of the Jasper Mountain Program. There were only six children in the Program at that time and they were out of school and ready for an active summer.  The three staff had divided up times to supervise the children and I did most of the recreation with the children.  I was a runner and when the children were in school I was able to run by myself, but now they were out of school and I had the children to supervise.  My plan was to run first thing in the morning before breakfast and sometimes one or two of the children asked to run with me and we took off along a trail that used to be the former railroad track.  As more children asked to come along, running on a trail was not ideal because the children all ran at a different pace and all had differing levels of endurance as to how far they could go.  This would go on for the next three years until we built a running track on the property.  During the fourth summer the children worked together and leveled off the ground, went to the local lumber mill and brought back many pickup truck loads of sawdust to make the running track.  The result was an ideal running surface on a level field where 17.5 laps equaled one mile.  With the track in place I could supervise the growing number of children (now up to 12) while I ran.  Although periodically a child had shown interest in running with me, I did not anticipate that many of our emotionally disturbed children would want to do something difficult like running.  So the children would sit next to the track while I ran my four miles and then we would all head to breakfast.  Partially due to their efforts to make the track and partially because they got bored just sitting there, but more and more children asked to join me for a few laps periodically running and walking.  Each morning there were more children running more laps.

My personal experience with running was not wonderful. I had found running unpleasant and very difficult and I avoided it growing up.  The first time I ran a mile without stopping was because it was required to join the football team and I found the experience horrible.  Despite being very involved in high school and college sports, I was not a runner.  I only began running grudgingly at the age of 26 when all the team sports were no longer available and I wanted to stay in good shape.  The health effects were so beneficial that I became a committed runner, but it was never fun.  With my bad attitude about the experience of running I would never have expected emotionally disturbed children to be interested or willing to do something so unpleasant.  I was wrong as it turned out.  It is not that the idea of breathing hard, enduring the pain, getting sweaty and pushing yourself beyond what you thought were your limits was all that appealing to our children over the years.  Actually I still am not certain why the children do it other than the practical aspect of the first thing in the morning running is what everyone does in the program.  They head to the track before breakfast and some walk/run and other run the whole time for 30 minutes while their laps are counted by the staff so they get credit.  We encourage the staff to run as well (a tough sell for some of them) and have found that the more participation from staff results in more participation from the children.  There are some positive aspects that encourage the children such as pride when their track shoes are moved each week up the 80 foot long mileage chart, there is some positive peer pressure to be one of the runners, and there are periodic incentives (shoes, MP3 players, running outfits, etc.).  However even today I marvel at how many of the children simply put in the effort and learn the amazing positive things that running can do for your personal health.  After all the benefits have keep me religiously doing this activity that I have never really liked for the last 39 years.

Decades of research have shown the same findings—running has consistently been found to be the most healthy single activity a person can do. The benefits are too numerous to give a complete list but the main benefits to emotionally disturbed children are:  belief in self, personal confidence, meeting a difficult goal, achieving success at a difficult task, improved respiration and circulation, improved stamina, developing coordination and muscle tone, weight loss (running helped one child last year lose 77 extra pounds), reduction in the need for numerous psychiatric medications, better sleep patterns, improved self-regulation, improved relaxation, reduced stress, enhanced stem cell development in the brain and overall improved brain health.  The list goes on and for decades it has been known that these benefits are available to everyone, but running is just difficult enough that not everyone can or is willing to do it.  Emotionally disturbed children in an intensive treatment program are the ideal population for the benefits of running.  The challenge is how to entice the children to run.  At Jasper Mountain it is the environment that does the enticing and this gradually developed over time to be what it is today.

However we have found that running can be incorporated into an existing program. When we developed a second residential treatment center at first it had no running program but through planning it was incorporated into the structure and the results were the same—the children participated.  There is no sign of the interest in running fading even after 30 years.  Just this year the children set new mileage records in both treatment centers.  The children collectively ran 3,000 miles in ten weeks.  This breaks down to an average of 1.5 miles per day for every one of the children!  Is it making a difference—without question!  We are not a track and field program not are we preparing the Olympians of the future.  Running is a small part of our treatment program, a small component with huge positive gains.  Will I personally continue to run?  Yes, just as long as I am able because of what running gives back to me.   Will our Programs continue to have a running program?  Yes, as long as the adults do their part to make running available and teach the children the benefits of healthy lifestyle decisions like aerobic activity.

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Understanding and Treating Attachment Problems in Children: What Went Wrong and How Problems Can Be Fixed

By Dave Ziegler, Ph.D.

This somewhat complex article reviews the basic tenets of traditional attachment theory and describes both its strengths and weaknesses. Revisions to attachment theory are suggested and detailed explanation is provided of both the causes and treatment of various types of attachment problems. It is both a technical road map and a practical guide to the journey.  Although complex, It has been written to be understandable to professionals and parents alike. (31 pages)   Link to full article here.

Adoption and Attachment

By Dave Ziegler, Ph.D.

 The Adoption Courtship Model

Out of necessity, Jasper Mountain Center (JMC) staff have attempted to isolate why some adoptions worked during the first five years of our program and why most didn’t.  The result of two years of considering this question has been the development and implementation of an adoption model for children who

  • are emotionally disturbed;
  • are hard to place; and/or
  • have single or multiple adoptive failures

The operating principles for our Adoption Courtship Model are the following:

  • Standard adoptive procedures are insufficient for special-needs children and their prospective families.
  • The odds are often against a successful adoption with these children, without preparation, training, and professional support.
  • The child and the family must be prepared for the reality of this adoptive relationship.
  • The adoption commitment must be made by both the child and the family and can only be made based on a relationship, not on information or interest.

The model has three phases:

  1. Phase I.  The child is prepared for the adoption by understanding his or her role in making it work or not work.  The child’s considerable power in the situation is made clear.  The family goes through the regular certification steps and is selected by the adoption committee.  The family meets with the caseworker and JMC staff to learn what to expect from the initial meeting.  The child is also prepared for this meeting.  The two sides meet with the caseworker and family therapist.  The child begins to build trust by getting to know the family as a unit, then the family members as individuals, and finally in the home environment.
  2. Phase II.  This is where the reality must begin to come in.  Both sides have an image of what they are doing and who they are doing it with, but it must become very clear and very real.  This phase is characterized by extended visits and family counseling.  The process starts with a focus on the strengths and positive attributes of both sides, moves to the faults and flaws of both sides, and finally underscores the realities of the combination of strengths and weaknesses of the adoption.
  3. Phase III.  There are three necessary commitments for the adoption to work.  The initial commitment on the part of both child and family is a commitment of interest, time and effort in regard to adoption.  The second is a commitment to relationships with the child, and the child to the family.  The final commitment is to family for life.  The last commitment is the final step in a successful adoption of special-needs children, not the first step as in regular adoptions.  This commitment must be made to a person, not a concept.  This is important for these children because the reality of how difficult adoption is with disturbed children must be stronger than the commitment to the adoption as a concept.

Suggestions and Techniques

PHASE I. 

Preparation.  Phase I starts long before the family and the child meet.  One of the keys here is preparation.  There is an important question to ask before the specific adoption work begins:  “Has everyone received some preparation for the adoption?”  Too often the family receives more preparation than the child.  Preparing the child for an adoptive placement should ideally begin a year prior to meeting family, with specific counseling on the issues that will come up.  Along with adoption classes, it is valuable to have the prospective parents meet with the adoption worker or counselor who will work with the transition process to prepare the family for the probable struggles that are ahead.

Initial meeting.  After the adoption committee gives its blessing to a match and the Adoption Courtship Model is decided on, it is then important for the family to meet with the adoption worker(s) and the counselor who will provide the transition counseling and discuss the model, the process, and the goals.  Keep in mind that most adoptive families are in a mild to huge rush to have the child.  A rushed courtship is almost always problematic.  Gain the family’s agreement and commitment to the process or don’t use this model (in general, the bigger the rush the family is in, the more concerns there are about their readiness).

The initial meeting of child and family.  Again the suggestion is for the worker(s) and counselor to be actively involved.  Often for this population, meeting the parents alone before children are involved is less complex and overwhelming for the adoptive child.  There should be informal time between the child and the parents, as well as the worker and counselor outlining what will be happening over the next few months and why.  Keep the meeting from being stuffy or too formal.  Make it clear that the goal is to see if in the long run this is a good match for everyone concerned.  All sides will have a voice (empower the child to influence his or her future and you will have a much better response).

Process.  Start with meetings in counseling to get to know each other.  Have the whole family come the second time.  Use techniques to rapidly point out the different personalities in the family (who is the clown, who is grumpy in the morning, etc.)  A technique here is to have the members of the family write on a sheet of paper the things they like and dislike about the family member to their left and right.  The counselor reads the items and has the family guess whom it was written about.  Start with afternoon visits away from the family home.  Go to daylong visits and then an overnight visit, again away from the family home.  This is to equalize the playing field.  In the family home only the adoptive child is unfamiliar with the environment.  In a park, restaurant, or motel at the beach, the focus is on the relationships, not on getting used to the family’s turf.  The adoptive child should have a chance to get to know all family members at least a little, both individually and together, before going to the family home.

Counseling.  The initial meetings and discussions should take place in the counselor’s office.  After each visit there should be a session.  The counselor plays the role of bringing the family and child together and facilitating the process so both sides know that the situation is organized and under control.

PHASE II.

Counseling.  Counseling continues to be frequent but not necessarily occurring each time.  Involve foster care providers to help make the child’s strengths and weaknesses clear.

Process.  GET REAL!  Arrange extended visits, primarily in the home environment.  Get away from special events and get down to everyday life.  The goal of this phase is to make it clear what this adoptive combination will really be like.

Techniques.  Stress the strengths and weaknesses of the match, the family, and the child.  It may be difficult or embarrassing, but it is time to air everyone’s strong points as well as dirty laundry.  Use techniques like having everyone answer such questions as “When I get really angry, I …,” “I show sadness by …,” “When I am grumpy, the best way to deal with me is …,” etc.  Role-play some of this.  Have children act like Mom in the morning before coffee.  How do the parents fight with each other?  Have the adoptive child act out some of his less impressive qualities, such as being rude, disrespectful or hurtful.  Whatever family members will see later should be talked about, even acted out, now.

PHASE III.

Process.  Now that everyone has met and should know a lot about one another, the emphasis shifts to commitments.  There are three levels of commitment:  (1) time and effort, (2) relationship, and (3) life commitment.  Commitment 1 should have long since been made and operationalized.  It will be important to review and evaluate how everyone has handled this commitment because it will be an indicator of the next two.  How interested is everyone in a commitment to relationship?  In the case of attachment-disordered children, this must be reviewed carefully to have realistic expectations.  It is clearly time to begin putting out on the table the issue of life-long commitment.  Again, the commitment must be to people, not to the concept of adoption.

Counseling.  Here is where the skill of the counselor is most needed.  There is much complexity in commitments.  There may be resistance on everyone’s part to addressing this.  If things are going smoothly, why upset the apple cart?  No one really wants the final analysis to be halting the adoption because it is not overall a good match, but this may be the case.  The counselor must be firm and willing to be the bad guy.  The capacity of the child to commit himself may be problematic, and the parents may have better intentions than abilities.

Ritual.  If the adoption gets a green light, then some have found a formal recognition of the adoptive commitment an important step.  Consider having a ceremony.  Invite friends and throw a party.  Our culture does this for most important events.

A Final Thought

Adoptions can work with special-needs children, but the work is never completed (yet when is any parent’s job done?).  Despite an excellent placement for both the child and the family, the work has only begun.  The transition into the home will set an all-important tone, but don’t fool yourself that the job will get easier.  Our experience is that new struggles come up with each physical and developmental stage of the child.  But that just makes adoption like life—a new challenge around every corner.